Maintaining your indexes

Indexes are crucial to SQL Server performance. Having the right indexes might make the difference of day and night with your application performance – as I once talked here.

However, even having the right indexes is not everything. You have to keep them healthy. Indexes, as any other kinds of storage, is subjected to fragmentation. SQL Server works best if the index structure is compact and continuous, but with all of the inserts/updates/deletes, it’s inevitable to get fragmented. When the fragmentation grows, it starts affecting the performance of SQL Server: Instead of having to read just one page, it now have to read two, which increases both time and resource needed, and so on and so forth.

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Episerver caching issue with .NET 4.7

Update 1: The bug is fixed in .NET 4.7.1 (thanks to Pascal van der Horst for the information)

Update 2: The related bug is fixed in CMS Core 10.10.2 and 9.12.5. If upgrading to that version is not an option, you can contact Episerver support service for further assistance.

Original post:

If you are using Episerver and update to .NET 4.7 (even involuntarily, such as you are using DXC/Azure to host your websites. Microsoft updated Azure to .NET 4.7 on June 26th) , you might notice some weird performance issues. If your servers are in Europe, Asia or Australia, then you can see a peak in memory usage. If your servers in North America, then you can see the number of database calls increased. In both cases, your website performance is affected, the former can cause your websites to constantly restarts as memory usage reaches a threshold limit, and even more obvious in the latter. Why?

It was a known issue in .NET 4.7, as mentioned here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4035412/fix-expiration-time-issue-when-you-insert-items-by-using-the-cache-ins

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Episerver CMS performance optimization – part 1

This is an unusual post – it is not about Commerce – my area of expertise, but about CMS. Recently I’ve been working on some support cases where SQL Server instance is on high utilization, and in some scenarios it eventually slows down the site. After investigation, it’s likely to come from a small, simple and helpful feature: Simple address.

CMS content can have a property named “Simple address”, which allows you to create a “shortcut” url for that content. So if you have one page with “name in url” as “contact-us” under a page name “about-us” under Home page, you can access it via https://mysupercoolsite.com/en/about-us/contact-us. Or you can set the Simple address for that page as “contact-us”, and then you can access it directly via https://mysupercoolsite.com/contact-us.

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