• Commerce,  Episerver,  Order,  Uncategorized

    Control the thousand separator for Money in Episerver Commerce

    If you are selling goods in multiple markets which same currency but with different languages, such as EuroZone, you might notice that while everything looks quite good, except that the thousand separator might be off from time to time: it is always the same and does not change to match with the language, so sometimes it’s correct, sometimes it’s not. Let’s take a step back to see how to properly show the thousand delimiter  In the United States, this character is a comma (,). In Germany, it is a period (.). Thus one thousand and twenty-five is displayed as 1,025 in the United States and 1.025 in Germany. In Sweden,…

  • Commerce,  Episerver,  Performance,  Uncategorized

    Fixing ASP.NET Membership performance – part 1

    Even though it is not the best identity management system in the .NET world, ASP.NET Membership provider is still fairly widely used, especially for systems that have been running for quite long time with a significant amount of users: migrating to a better system like AspNetIdentity does not comes cheap. However, built from early days of ASP.NET mean Membership provider has numerous significant limitations: beside the “architecture” problems, it also has limited performance. Depends on who you ask, the ultimate “maximum” number of customers that ASP.NET membership provider can handle ranges from 30.000 to 750.000. That does not sound great. Today if you start a new project, you should be…

  • Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver,  Performance

    Speed up catalog routing if you have multiple children under catalog

    A normal catalog structure is like this: you have a few high level categories under the catalog, then each high level category has a few lower level categories under it, then each lower level category has their children, so on and so forth until you reach the leaves – catalog entries. However it is not uncommon that you have multiple children (categories and entries) directly under catalog. Even though that is not something you should do, it happens.  But that is not without drawbacks. You might notice it is slow to route to a product. It might not be visible to naked eyes, but if you use some decent profilers…

  • Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver

    Refactoring Commerce catalog code, a story

    It is not a secret that I am a fan of refactoring. Clean. shorter, simpler code is always better. It’s always a pleasure to delete some code while keeping all functionalities: less code means less possible bugs, and less places to change when you have to change. However, while refactoring can bring a lot of enjoying to the one who actually does it, it’s very hard to share the experience: most of the cases it’s very specific and the problem itself is not that interesting to the outside world. This story is an exception because it might be helpful/useful for other Commerce developer.

  • Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver,  Order,  Performance

    Commerce batching performance – part 2: Loading prices and inventories

    UPDATE: When looked into it, I realize that I have a lazy loading collection of entry codes, so each test had to spent time to resolve the entry code(s) from the content links. That actually costs quite a lot of time, and therefore causing the performance tests to return incorrect results. That was corrected and the results are now updated. In previous post we talked about how loading orders in batch can actually improve your website performance, and we came to a conclusion that 1000-3000 orders per batch probably yields the best performance result. But orders are not the only thing you would need to load on your website. A…

  • Commerce,  Episerver,  Order,  Performance

    Commerce batching performance – part 1: Loading orders

    One of best practices for better performance – not just with Commerce or Episerver Commerce, is to batch your calls to load data. In theory, if you want to load a lot of data, loading by both end will be problematic: if you load each record one by one, the overhead for opening the connection and retrieve data will be too much. But if you load all of them, then it is likely that you will end up with either time out exception in database end, or out of memory exception in your application. The better way is to of course, loading them by smaller batch: either 10, 20, or…

  • Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver

    Speed up your catalog indexing performance – part 2

    Almost two years ago I wrote part 1 here: https://vimvq1987.com/speed-catalog-entries-indexing/ on how to speed up your catalog indexing performance. If you have a fairly big catalog with frequent changes, it might take longer time than necessary to build the index incrementally. (Rebuild index, in other hands, just delete everything and rebuild from scratch, so it is not affected by the long queue in ApplicationLog). I have seen some cases where rebuilding the entire index, is actually faster than waiting for it to build incrementally. The tip in previous blog post should work very well if you are using anything lower than Commerce 11.6, but that is no longer the case!

  • Commerce,  Debugging,  Episerver

    A curious case of memory dump diagnostic: How Stackify can cause troubles to your site

    It’s been a while since my last blog post, and this time it will be fun time with windbg. One of DXC customers has been having problem with instances of their site hang and restart. We at Episerver takes the availability and performance of DXC sites very seriously, therefore I was asked to help diagnosing the problem. It’s something I’d like to do and to learn anyway, so game is on. The golden standard for looking at the kind of those problems is still the tried and trusted Windbg. With the help from the Managed Services Engineer, I was able to access several memory dumps from the site. Most of…

  • Book,  Commerce,  Episerver

    Episerver Commerce: A problem-solution approach is now draft complete

    6 months ago I announced that I was working on a second book on Episerver Commerce. Unlike the first one where I tried to provide a systematic approach about the framework, this book focuses on the bite-size recipes, each one is a solution to solve a real world problem. It’s one problem solved, at a time. The world is big and the possibilities are endless, there might be more than one solution to a problem, but I tried to give the best one to my knowledge, experience. I hope that by talking about it, I also give information about how the API:s work, what to use, what should be avoided.…

  • Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver

    Getting all non published variations

    I got a question from a colleague today: A customer has multiple languages (8 of them). They need to make sure all variants are published in all languages. That is of course a reasonable request, but there is no feature builtin for such requirement. But good news is that can be done with ease. If you want to try this as practice, go ahead – I think it’s a good exercise for your Episerver Commerce-fu skills. To do this task, we need the snippet to traverse the catalog from here https://leanpub.com/epicommercerecipes/read_sample