Hide certain tabs in Catalog UI

It has been a while since I write something in my blog – have been “fairly” busy making Commerce even faster for a while. But I should take a break from time to time and share things that will benefit community as a whole – and this is one of that break.

Today I come across this question on World https://world.episerver.com/forum/developer-forum/Episerver-Commerce/Thread-Container/2019/10/remove-item-from-tab-in-content-editor/ . Basically, how to hide a specific tab in the Catalog UI when you open All Properties view of a catalog content.

The original poster has found a solution from https://world.episerver.com/forum/legacy-forums/Episerver-7-CMS/Thread-Container/2013/10/Is-there-any-way-to-hide-the-settings-tab/ . While it works, I think it is not the easiest or simple way to do it. Is there a simpler way? Yes.

The Related Entries tab is generated for content with implements IAssociating interface. Bad news is EntryContentBase implements that interface, so each and every entry type you have, has that tab. But good news is we can override the implementation – by just override the property defined by IAssociating.

How?

Simple as this

        /// <inheritdoc />
        [IgnoreMetaDataPlusSynchronization]
        [Display(AutoGenerateField = false)]
        public override Associations Associations { get; set; }

We are overriding the Associations property, and the change the Display attribute to have AutoGenerateField = false. Just try to build it and see

No Related Views! But is it the end of the story. Not yet, Related Views can still be accessed by the menu

A complete solution is to also disable that view. How? By using the same technique here https://world.episerver.com/blogs/Quan-Mai/Dates/2019/8/enable-sticky-mode-for-catalog-content/ i.e. using `UIDescriptor`. You can disable certain views by adding this to your constructor

AddDisabledView(CommerceViewConfiguration.RelatedEntriesEditViewName);

A few notes:

  • This only affects the type you add the property, so for example you can hide the tab for Products, but still show it for Variants.
  • Related Entries is not the only tab you can hide. By applying the same technique you can have a lot of control over what you can hide, and what you show. I will leave that to you for exploration!

Read only Catalog UI – part 1

https://world.episerver.com/forum/developer-forum/Episerver-Commerce/Thread-Container/2015/6/read-only-catalog/

A while back, we had this question on World. It’s not uncommon to update the catalog data by an external system, mostly from a PIM – Product information management system. In such cases, it might not make senses to enable editing in Catalog UI. You might need the new UI for the other parts, such as Marketing UI, but you wouldn’t want the editors to accidentally update the product information – because those would be lost, anyway.

Is there away to do it? Yes, there is.

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The Catalog UI trade-off: performance or better UI

I supposed this is a well known feature, but I was asked more than once about it, so it’s better to write something here to clarify the confusions.

If you have some very, very big catalogs, you probably have seen this “notification” in Catalog UI

By default, the Catalog UI groups a product and its variations in a parent-children view (they are not exactly parent-children, by the way). However, to do that, it needs to know about all the entries in that specific category. If it’s a small category, it should be no problem, but if it’s big one, then it’s inevitable slow. The lazy loading which the catalog content list only loads the contents when you scroll to them is not helping in this matter. Moreover, the grouping introduces an overhead for the UI, and having too many groups can severely affect the performance. Trust me, you won’t like a sluggish UI.

This improvement was introduced way back – 7.11 if I remember correctly – thanks to my colleague Magnus Rahl. To this day it’s still valuable – the performance was improved – but not that much to remove the threshold completely (And the improvement to the catalog versioning in Commerce 9 should have nothing to do with this).

When you see this notification, and if you’re unhappy with it, you have two (primary) options: Either to sub-categorize your category – i.e. introduce sub categories so each will have a smaller number of entries. Or increase the value of threshold.

Each approach has its own disadvantages. Sub-categorizing might break your SEO, while the second approach will undoubtedly effect the UI performance. Your call!

Now – the tricky part – which number to configure in SimplifiedCatalogListingThreshold setting. Obviously, it must be greater than the biggest number of entries in a category. But how to obtain that number? I’ve seen the confusion to raise that value to 3000, 5000, or even 10000 and it’s still not working. No, you can’t guess, you have to know for sure.

One simple option is to look at Commerce Manager Catalog Management. There is a small text in right corner of the list which shows the number of entries in that category (No, it’s not available in the Catalog UI, but I assume it would be helpful?)

 

The nuke option is to look at the database. Usually we recommend to avoid manipulate the database directly, as it can be dangerous – but here is a little code which only queries data (so practical harmless)

SELECT CatalogNodeId, Count(CatalogEntryId) 

FROM dbo.NodeEntryRelation

GROUP BY CatalogNodeId

ORDER BY Count(CatalogEntryId) DESC

Now you know the biggest number of the entries in a category – just change the threshold in setting. Try it and see if the UI Performance is acceptable to you.

The hidden danger of dot (Or why should your metafield not contain . in the name)

A dot (.) – it is harmless. What harm can it do, it looks pretty innocent.

And yet it can break your Catalog UI.

Psyduck, from Pokemon Go

A dot can look pretty harmless and innocent, just like a Psyduck. Frankly, its eyes are also two dots.

Catalog UI relies on the Shell UI from CMS to render properties and such. Shell UI, in its hands, needs to know about the metadata of the properties. When you have dot in the metafield names, the MetaDataPropertyMapper will create an Property with that name on site start up. And then when you open All properties mode, Shell UI will request your content type models, and CMS Core will happily return those properties.

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