Hide certain tabs in Catalog UI

It has been a while since I write something in my blog – have been “fairly” busy making Commerce even faster for a while. But I should take a break from time to time and share things that will benefit community as a whole – and this is one of that break.

Today I come across this question on World https://world.episerver.com/forum/developer-forum/Episerver-Commerce/Thread-Container/2019/10/remove-item-from-tab-in-content-editor/ . Basically, how to hide a specific tab in the Catalog UI when you open All Properties view of a catalog content.

The original poster has found a solution from https://world.episerver.com/forum/legacy-forums/Episerver-7-CMS/Thread-Container/2013/10/Is-there-any-way-to-hide-the-settings-tab/ . While it works, I think it is not the easiest or simple way to do it. Is there a simpler way? Yes.

The Related Entries tab is generated for content with implements IAssociating interface. Bad news is EntryContentBase implements that interface, so each and every entry type you have, has that tab. But good news is we can override the implementation – by just override the property defined by IAssociating.

How?

Simple as this

        /// <inheritdoc />
        [IgnoreMetaDataPlusSynchronization]
        [Display(AutoGenerateField = false)]
        public override Associations Associations { get; set; }

We are overriding the Associations property, and the change the Display attribute to have AutoGenerateField = false. Just try to build it and see

No Related Views! But is it the end of the story. Not yet, Related Views can still be accessed by the menu

A complete solution is to also disable that view. How? By using the same technique here https://world.episerver.com/blogs/Quan-Mai/Dates/2019/8/enable-sticky-mode-for-catalog-content/ i.e. using `UIDescriptor`. You can disable certain views by adding this to your constructor

AddDisabledView(CommerceViewConfiguration.RelatedEntriesEditViewName);

A few notes:

  • This only affects the type you add the property, so for example you can hide the tab for Products, but still show it for Variants.
  • Related Entries is not the only tab you can hide. By applying the same technique you can have a lot of control over what you can hide, and what you show. I will leave that to you for exploration!

Please, rebuild your database indexes, now

I will make it quick and to the point: if you are expecting a lot of customers visiting your site tomorrow (and you should) for Black Friday, you should rebuild your database indexes, now.

On average, it will help you to serve more customers and they will be happier with a more responsive, faster website. On best cases it will help prevent catastrophes.

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A curious case of SQL execution plan, part 2

Recently I wrote about how to look into, identify and solve the problem with a SQL Server execution plan – as you can read here: http://vimvq1987.com/curious-case-sql-execution-plan/

I have some more time to revisit the query now, and I realized I made a “small” mistake. The “optimized” query is using a Clustered Index Scan

So it’s not as fast as it should be, and it will perform quite poorly in no cache scenario (when the buffer is empty, for example) – it takes about 40s to complete. Yes it’s still better than the original one, both in non cached and cached cases. But it’s not good enough. An index scan, even cached, is not only slower, but also more prone to deadlocks. It’s also worse in best case scenario, when the original one can use the proper index seek.

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Quicksilver + ServiceAPI: the authentication issues

It’s possible to run Quicksilver and ServiceAPI on a same site, with some modifications, as I blogged here. However, if you go down that path, there is something you must keep in mind: They are not using the same authentication mechanism.

I’ve seen issues where Quicksilver implementations have some WebAPI controllers, which were working fine until ServiceAPI is installed. The controllers started returning null for CustomerContext.Current.CustomerContact, and so on, breaking some functionalities. It’s bad, yes, but it happens because of reasons.

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You can now finally hate workflows

For a good long amount of time, workflows have been an essential part of Episerver Commerce (and even before that, Mediachase eCF). Once you get into order system, you just can’t escape workflows – because you need them. They handle many – if not all things, from validating items, checking inventories (to make sure that you are not selling something out-of-stock, or just discontinued (think of Galaxy Note 7, poor little shiny phone)), applying promotions, calculating taxes, process payments, and finally adjust inventories (yay, a customer places an order, let’s ship to him as soon as possible, firstly allocate the goods for him). And workflows are even required by later processing – when you complete the shipments (another happy customer!), or when you issue a return or an exchange (well, let’s keep the customer still happy).

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EntryContentBase, MetaObject, CatalogEntryDto, Entry: which should you use?

It can be pretty confusing for new Commerce developers to understand how to work effectively with entries in Commerce. There are many things which represent the same concepts, however they are different and their APIs are not compatible. So which is which and what should you use?

Which is which

  • CatalogEntryDto is the DataSet to represent one or more entries (CatalogEntryDto can of course be empty). Beside the basic information like Name, Code, or MetaClassId, depends on how did you load it, a CatalogEntryDto can contain information about the assets, the associations or the variations (you can specify what to load by using CatalogEntryResponseGroup parameter. CatalogEntryDto, however, does not contain information of the metadata system of an entry – for example, if you add a metafield named “Description” to your entry metaclass – that is not available in a CatalogEntryDto.
    CatalogEntryDto can be loaded or saved by ICatalogSystem methods.

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Catalog Search APIs are for editing only!

If you are using Catalog Search APIs for any customer-facing features, you are doing it wrong!

I have seen this problem a couple of times – the search feature on the site is “dead” – it is very slow, and the log file is usually filled with dead lock or timeout error. As it turns out, the search feature was implemented by Catalog Search APIs, which is a big no-no.

To be clear, there are two builtin APIs related to searching in Episerver Commerce: the “fast” one, which can be done via SearchManager, ISearchCriteria and ISearchResults, is the SearchProvider APIs. It’s the indexed search (strictly speaking, you can make it not “indexed”, but that’s beside the point), and the actual search functions will be provided by providers, like LuceneSearchProvider, Solr35SearchProvider, or FindSearchProvider.

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