• gaming,  ranting,  reviews

    A super short review of Xenoblade Chronicles 2

    I’m still just 1/3 way through the game. Here’s some of my thoughts so far Hit: Gorgeous world. No it’s not the level of graphic detail of Horizon Zero Dawn, but given Switch’s processing power, the game looks absolutely amazing. Pyra is really cute (Talking about her face) Miss Pyra is overly sexualized. .Does Monolith need to let her wear a thong into battle. While it’s common in Japanese Role Playing Games (“fans service”, they said), it’s not what gaming should be. The fetch quests are really, really boring. They need to die. Looting is tedious. Too many “collection points”, too little value or interest for each of them. The…

  • Commerce,  Episerver,  Random thoughts,  ranting,  Tips

    Why you should upgrade to the latest version

    I made no secret that I’m a die-hard advocate for upgrading to latest EPiServer CMS/Commerce version. There are several reasons for that, mostly from new shiny features that your businesses dearly need, new big performance improvements that your customers firmly demand. But there is another, not so obvious reason: support. Let me tell you a story. This morning we received a support case from support team. A customer recently upgraded from Commerce 7.5 (Eww) to 11.7 (Yay!), things went well except they had a small problem with data displaying in Catalog UI. Some of the properties were not properly displayed, but they are still showing correct in Commerce Manager.

  • Learning,  Life,  Random thoughts,  ranting,  Tips,  Uncategorized

    Choose your battles

    This is the third part of the series: How to survive and thrive – a series for new developers to become better at their jobs. You can read the first two parts here and here. In military, there is a term of “uphill battle”. That when you have to fight your way up a hill, when you enemy controls the top. It’s a very difficult fight and your chance of success is low. Any experienced military leader knows uphill battles are something you should avoid until there are no other options. That also applies with any jobs. Including programming. The truth is, you shouldn’t fight the battles you can’t win.

  • ranting,  Writing

    Why do games need more Elena (Fisher)

    Elena’s a strong, independent woman, with her own motivations and thoughts. She’s indeed attractive (very attractive if you think about Uncharted 4), but in terms of being healthy and fit, not being overly sexy as a “fan service” (Japanese games, I’m looking at you)   She’s not some female characters who are over-confident, and/or over-powered, to the point they don’t even need men. She does not work alone. She works with Nathan Drake to overcome the odds.

  • Collection,  Random thoughts,  ranting,  Tips,  Writing

    The art of asking questions

    This is the second part of a series about most important skills for developer. The first part, about searching for answer skill, can be read here. Searching for the answer is usually the fastest way to solve a problem But searching on Google might not be enough to find you the answers, you might be the first to encounter the problem, or you might be searching for the wrong keyword. Sometimes, you have to ask the questions, hoping that some one, some where does know about the problem, and is kind enough to spend some time reading your questions, and typing the answers. For free.

  • Learning,  Random thoughts,  ranting,  Writing

    The most important skill (of a good programmer)

    Being programmer(*) is hard. Being a good programmer is, of course, even harder. Unlike countless other jobs where the daily work is a routine, and being good at your job is to be efficient at that routine, being programmer is all about constantly learning and doing new things. Being a good programmer is about being fast at learning, and doing new things well. The process might stay for a while, but the content of the job is constantly changing. (If you keep doing same content over and over again, you are doing it wrong)

  • ranting,  Scam

    Beware of unwanted subscriptions

    Updated December 23rd 2017: My wife talked with JustFab UK over the phone last week, and they told her to write an email to them. They promised to refund all of the monthly subscriptions, which they did, today. We are of course happy to get our money back, and I think JustFab UK appears to less “scam-y” then they does before , so I updated this post title to reflect that. Still, beware of your unwanted subscriptions. The original post as below: Later tonight I was checking my bank statements – to see how much I have spent and how much I still have in my account – well, for the…

  • Random thoughts,  ranting

    Why I don’t code in my free time, and why you should not, too.

    Just read a story that bogged my mind. A “Technical/team lead” told a story, as an interviewer, he asked “a very good” candidate,  what does he/she like, and what does he/she do on his/her spare time. The answers were reading books, watching movies, and cooking. The candidate did not get hired, even thought he/she excelled at other technical questions. The interviewer expected him/her to “work” on his/her spare time. Like a pet project – to learn something new, or to sharpen the skills. The interviewer hired another candidate who does exactly that. I’m glad I was not neither in that kind of interview, nor I have that kind of boss.

  • Random thoughts,  ranting,  Writing

    May I trust your site?

    If your site has exceeding ads all over places, or you ask me to disable my ad-blocker, then no. If your site ask me to subscribe to your newsletter after 5 seconds, even before I read your post’s title, then no. If your site has auto-play videos that continue to play even if I scrolled down, then no. If your site has no comment section, then no. If you don’t moderate your comment section and it’s full of spam, then no. If your site open pops up, then no. If you site doesn’t have HTTPS, then that might raise suspects. (Yes you should look up in the address, this site…

  • Blogging,  Catalog,  Commerce,  Episerver,  ranting

    Catalog Search APIs are for editing only!

    If you are using Catalog Search APIs for any customer-facing features, you are doing it wrong! I have seen this problem a couple of times – the search feature on the site is “dead” – it is very slow, and the log file is usually filled with dead lock or timeout error. As it turns out, the search feature was implemented by Catalog Search APIs, which is a big no-no. To be clear, there are two builtin APIs related to searching in Episerver Commerce: the “fast” one, which can be done via SearchManager, ISearchCriteria and ISearchResults, is the SearchProvider APIs. It’s the indexed search (strictly speaking, you can make it…